Sand in the Oyster: Auden, Eliot, & the Making of a Poem by Dylan Thomas

1. Let’s do a thought experiment.  Here’s the scene:  It’s 1934, a decade less and less dominated by the powerful poetic voices of the  near-50ish T.S. Eliot and Ezra Pound, those enfant arbiters who initiated the modernist movement in the Anni Mirabiles years of a decade ago, and more and more by the 20-something new generation … Continue reading Sand in the Oyster: Auden, Eliot, & the Making of a Poem by Dylan Thomas

Trakl’s Helian, An Utterly New Thing

Trakl called "Helian" "the most precious and painful [poem] I have ever written."  He wrote it between December 1912 and January 1913.  I believe that the poem earned his description by dealing in entirely new ways with related themes that were difficult for him, as they would be for anyone:  the decline of family, and of civilization, … Continue reading Trakl’s Helian, An Utterly New Thing

Trakl: The Dark Paths Of Men Are Strange

Trakl's four mature prose poems written after 1913 all use the new style begun in "Psalm" and "Helian."  All are strange and mysterious, fragmentary narratives that hint at a greater story lurking just beyond what we can easily see.  As with all things that hint of narrative, once we are swept up in it, once we engage, we … Continue reading Trakl: The Dark Paths Of Men Are Strange